According to The Guardian’s recent investigation into the various alternative milks on the market, oat ‘milk’ is the best, low-impact choice when it comes to dairy-alternative ‘milks’ in 2020. However, a quick scan of our supermarket shelves doesn’t reveal many local options (or anything at all at the moment. Thanks, Coronavirus! 🧻🧻🧻). There are a few great brands doing cool stuff out of Sweden and the UK - they have cool packaging and fun names, but wait, where the Aussie oats at?

Well, friends, fret no longer. It takes quite literally five minutes to make your own oat milk at home that has close to zero food miles attached, and a week’s worth will cost you less than $1. A bargain that’s better for the planet. Here’s how:

How to Make Australian Oat Milk
Recipe adapted from minimalistbaker.com

Ingredients:

1 cup rolled organic Australian oats
4 cups water
1 date (for a little necessary sweetness)

Method:

Blend oats, water and date in a blender on high speed for 30-40 seconds until the oats have been blitzed into a pulp, and the water is creamy and milky. Strain through very fine muslin, or a clean t-shirt, and squeeze out excess liquid. That’s it! Oat milk! Done! Keep in a sealed jar or jug in the fridge, and shake very well before using each time. Some sediment will settle to the bottom of your jar, this is normal.

Reserve the oat pulp for a batch of banana bread, cook them into porridge, or add to a bowl of plant-based yoghurt and a little chopped fruit for breakfast.

Some notes - pre-soaking oats before blending (as you would almonds), results in a slimy oat milk, so no need to soak. Over-blending also produces the same result, so blend for only 30-40 seconds before straining. If you’re looking to froth milk for a latte, this recipe will not froth very well. Most imported and processed oat milk includes an oil thickener, which allows milk to thicken and froth when heated, this recipe has no such additives and so just won’t work (The Minimalist Baker has a good alternative frothing milk recipe here!). But that’s ok! It works extremely well in iced coffee, tea or on cereal.

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