Photo sharing is dead. Or so declared Instagram’s Director, Adam Mosseri, who announced in June, “we are no longer a photo sharing app.” A dramatic flex. He did later, for the record, go on to confirm photography will always play an important role, but you probably already knew that. (You can squiz his original post here.

 

As it happens, the social media platform that shaped a millennial generation will, for the next few months, be turning its attention to on the mantra entertainment, entertainment, entertainment, by putting all their energy into four key areas: 

 

  1. Creators
  2. Shopping
  3. Messaging
  4. Video!!! 

 

It’s all part of a play to compete with their arch nemesis TikTok, the video-only social media app that has been growing at an eye-watering rate since expanding to a global audience in 2018. 

 

What does that mean for your business? Basically, you can expect the algorithm to give videos (posted as Stories, Reels, regular posts and IGTV) a VIP feed pass over the coming months. That includes putting your video content into the feeds of users who are not yet following your brand. Easy wins! 

 

Which brings us to today’s School Up: four quick video hacks you can get stuck into right now. Turn photos into mp4s and stop users mid-scroll with animations that refashion static graphics into dancing ones. Three out of four hacks require Photoshop, BTW, to keep things focused—and one’s on iMovie to keep things free. But you can easily create each on Premiere Pro and After Effects, too.

 

Let’s schmove!

 

The Pan: How to make an image move 

 

A great trick for turning a jpeg into an mp4. Takes 5-minutes.

  1. Import your image, crop to square, 4:5 or 9:16, then place it into position (from where you would like it to start panning from). 
  2. Make sure you activate your transform keyframe* by clicking on the stopwatch next to the word ‘transform,’ placing the playhead at the start of the clip. 
  3. Now drag the play head to the end of your clip. Press CMD+T and drag your image to your desired direction (see example up above). This will create another keyframe so the video is anchored by two points of movement. 
  4. To export click on the three line icon on the left top hand side of your timeline and toggle down to press render video. Fill in your file name and make sure you are exporting the right dimensions and file type (H.264 is an .mp4 file). Then click render!

 

The Jiggle: How to animate your next graphic

 

Bored of trying to make product images interesting in a static image — we hear you! 

  1. Make key elements, like text or cutout images, move with this Photoshop hack. First up, activate the stopwatch next to the Transform function in your timeline. This will give you your first keyframe! 
  2. Move the play head along a few frames and press CMD+T. Angle the product image to your desired position. 
  3. Do this a few times making sure to change the position of the product image using CMD+T as you forward on your timeline.
  4. To export click on the three line icon on the left top hand side of your timeline and toggle down to press render video. Fill in your file name and make sure you are exporting the right dimensions and file type (H.264 is an .mp4 file). Then click Render!

 

Voilà — you have an animated product image!

 

 

The Boomerang: How to make your first 3-seconds pop

 

Make your video pop with by reversing a section back and forward, kinda like a Boomerang, to hold your audience's attention. 

  1. Using iMovie, import your video and drag it into the timeline below. 
  2. Place the playhead to the point in the clip where you would like to reverse it. Right click and select split clip or CMD+B—this will split your video in two. 
  3. Drag the playhead along to the end point of the section you would like to reverse and CMD+B. 
  4. Now copy and paste this clip twice (or as many times as you’d like) CMD+C and CMD+V. 
  5. Select the middle clip and go to the top left toolbar select the timewatch and click reverse. 
  6. To export your video as an mp4 file go to the top of the toolbar on the left hand side and click share. Select the file export function making sure you’ve got these attributes filled in correctly — Format: Video and Audio, Resolution: 1080p 60, Quality: High and Compress: Faster then click next and save your video.

The Multitakser: How to create a split-screen video

 

  1. Make sure you have two or more videos that are the same dimensions and length and drag them into the iMovie timeline. They should be side by side, but for the sake of this example, let’s drag one on top of the other. 
  2. With the top video selected go to the top left toolbar and click on the video overlay icon (the first icon with two rectangles overlaid) toggle down on the first option to select SPLIT SCREEN. Then play with the positioning on the left to either place your videos next to each other—top/bottom or right/left. Another iMovie hack this way.
  3. To export your video as an mp4 file go to the top of the toolbar on the left hand side and click share. Select the file export function making sure you’ve got these attributes filled in correctly — Format: Video and Audio, Resolution: 1080p 60, Quality: High and Compress: Faster then click next and save your video.

 

Terms:

 

Keyframes

Keyframing uses frames to define motion and/or animation. Every frame is a keyframe when we create frame by frame animation so when you want to move an object or image you have to use a keyframe to inform that movement. When you want to change directions or movement you will need to make sure your playhead is forward in time so you can place a new keyframe into your animation.

 

Playhead

Shows what point you are at in the video or animation. You can watch the video play by dragging the playhead in your timeline.

 

Timeline

Organises and controls a document's content over time in layers and frames. Usually sits at the bottom of your screen as you edit or animate videos.